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Midcentury Meets Midwest

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Do you know your Eichlers from your Eames? Or do you just enjoy the streamlined designs of everyday midcentury houses?

Either way, the May 31 "Back to the Future: A Mid-Century Modern Tour" offers a multistop architectural time warp to anyone interested in finding out about window walls, stone fireplaces, butterfly roofs or retro-minded renovations. The tour features five homes in the Avalon Hills and Devonshire neighborhoods of Indianapolis, including one designed by Indianapolis' Avriel Shull. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 on the day of the tour, and can be purchased online, at Indiana Landmarks Center and Form+Function.

The dining room of Cori and Tim Conder’s Autumn Lane home shows the mid-century use of glass to integrate indoors and outdoors. - PAIGE WASSEL/ INDIANA LANDMARKS
  • Paige Wassel/ Indiana Landmarks
  • The dining room of Cori and Tim Conder’s Autumn Lane home shows the mid-century use of glass to integrate indoors and outdoors.

Want to dive deeper into the vintage style of the Circle City and beyond? Here are a few additional recommendations:

-- Commercial Article 03, written by architectural historian Connie Ziegler and designed by Jon and James Sholly of Commercial Artisan, shares Avriel Shull's journey from artist to self-taught architect.

-- Charles A. Birnbaum, president of the Cultural Landscape Foundation, presents "Modern Landscape Architecture: Transition and Transformation" May 29 at 6 p.m. at the Indianapolis Museum of Art's Toby Theatre, with the mission of inspiring an ardent appreciation of the verdant applications of design in gardens, parks and beyond.

-- "The Greatest Unknown Architect," Jan Ruhtenberg worked with some of modern design's greatest figures and created homes for wealthy clients, but finished his career in Indianapolis, working on small projects in relative obscurity.

-- For a laugh, click over to the Unhappy Hipsters website, depicting a darker take on streamlined design with snarky takes on the lives depicted in glossy interiors magazines.

Lalita Amos and Garland Borden studied Ebony and Jet magazines from the late ‘50s and early ‘60s for period furnishing ideas for their home on Knyghton Road. - PAIGE WASSEL, INDIANA LANDMARKS
  • Paige Wassel, Indiana Landmarks
  • Lalita Amos and Garland Borden studied Ebony and Jet magazines from the late ‘50s and early ‘60s for period furnishing ideas for their home on Knyghton Road.

Cover image: Amos and Borden bought their post-and-beam house in 2011 from the Mann family, who built it in 1958. They loved it the minute they entered the bluestone-floored foyer and saw the glass-walled open living and dining area. Credit: Chilluffo Media

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