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First Friday Brings the Funk

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There are Fridays that can be routine enough to make you a little blasé, and then there are First Fridays. September's First Friday will expose you to a lot of new art, including comic book-inspired pieces, light-dappled urban landscapes, jazz, spray-painted stencil work and fiber art. Galleries, studios, a coffee shop and even a meadery are all showcasing local artists. So get out there and see what the artists are doing these days.

Cory Zeigert is one of the three artists showing work at The Attic's exhibition in the Do317 Lounge this First Friday. - COURTESY OF THE ATTIC
  • Courtesy of The Attic
  • Cory Zeigert is one of the three artists showing work at The Attic's exhibition in the Do317 Lounge this First Friday.

Out of the Attic

The Attic gallery in the Murphy Arts Center building in Fountain Square will display the work of R6D4, Ronlewhorn and Cory Zeigert, but the show's so big they moved it into the larger Do317 Lounge on the second floor.

R6D4's comic book-themed pop art, Ronlewhorn's illustrations, and Zeigert's work will be on display in a show for those 21 and older from 7 p.m. to 11 a.m. in the lounge, which features a full bar, including signature cocktails from Ole Smoky Moonshine.

"Like a song you've never heard with a melody you've always known, my work explores moments and language from a shared Midwestern experience," Zeigert says. "From the strange universal wisdom of the folky idioms I've learned from my parents to roller skates, vacations and maps on the hoods of cars, each is a slice of my own personal memories and upbringing, but also generalized in such a way that each image and every word should convey a sense of familiarity."

Jason Rowland, who goes by R6D4 and is represented by Galerie F out of Chicago, uses stencils and spray paint for paintings that are influenced by comics, cartoons, and the skate culture of the 1980s and 1990s. Aaron Scamihorn's Ronlewhorn Industries produce nostalgic screen prints such as posters for CAKE, The Princess Bride and Scott Pilgrim.

Other galleries will be open at the Murphy Arts Center, where First Friday walkers also could see a short film on loop at the Heartland Basile Theatre or the photography of Rachel Schwebach at the Lux & Ivy vintage and alternative fashion shop.

Ronlewhorn Industries, aka Aaron Scamihorn, will be exhibiting work at The Attic of the Murphy Arts Center this Friday. - COURTESY OF THE ATTIC
  • Courtesy of The Attic
  • Ronlewhorn Industries, aka Aaron Scamihorn, will be exhibiting work at The Attic of the Murphy Arts Center this Friday.

Mead or coffee + art

You're out looking at a lot of art, so you might need to pop in somewhere to grab a refreshing beverage. If you happen to be bopping around Fountain Square, you could duck into New Day Craft Mead and Hard Cider or Funkyard Coffee Shop. Starting at 6 p.m., New Day is displaying the work of local photographer David Slivka, who's extensively photographed Americana and the countries of Scotland and Peru. At 7 p.m., Funkyard will show the work of self-taught artist Diane Wisehart, who sold her first painting at the age of 13 and has since painted wall murals throughout central Indiana.

"Her mind is cluttered with thoughts, emotions and ideas that will eventually get put to canvas, wood, leather or anything else she can get to hold still," the coffee shop's Facebook post announced. "Diane's style is eclectic, spontaneous and ever-changing. Wisehart's wish is that you will see something in her art that brightens up a small corner or your world, brings a thought to your mind or a smile to your face."

Wisehart's work will be displayed at the Funkyard through the end of the month.

Tim Burton meets Dr. Seuss meets the Grateful Dead

Gallery 924 will display a solo show of Indianapolis native William Denton Ray through September, with an opening scheduled for 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. this Friday.

Ray is a graphic designer who has worked with big-name clients such as Adidas, Hoosier Books and Trader Joe's. He's also a fine artist with a studio in the Harrison Center for the Arts whose work has been described as resembling Tim Burton and Dr. Seuss, with dashes of Grateful Dead album cover art artist Stanley Mouse and Rat Fink creator Ed "Big Daddy" Roth. He calls it "Whimsical Funk."

"Whimsical Funk, to say the least, is a visual explosion of my imaginary world," he says. "I often start a work with no plan or idea in mind. Often scribbling a fluid line until I find the subject matter, I often find characters, animals, animals' anatomy, clouds, words, arrows, code and symbolism inside these lines. Constantly changing the picture plane by pushing back and forth with color until the composition is revealed."

Ray works in a number of media, including acrylic, aluminum, computer, drawing media, watercolor and wood. He says he creates in his studio with music playing, and it's a major influence in his pieces.

"My works are constantly evolving during the creative process, and I, as the creator, have the ability to change the work on a whim," he explains. "The end result is artwork that is in the realm of a metaphysical fantasy that alludes to a magical and spiritual source."

Celebrating Glass charts the role of glass works in art from the 1800s to the modern day. - COURTESY OF FIVE SEASONS STUDIO
  • Courtesy of Five Seasons Studio
  • Celebrating Glass charts the role of glass works in art from the 1800s to the modern day.

Art for a good cause

Several artists, including Faith Blackwell, David Coleman, Andrew Young, Genna Pianki, Stephanie Doty, Rachel Hedges and Carmen Hurt, will be exhibiting in the studios at the Circle City Industrial Complex, 1125 Brookside Ave.

Martha Nahrwold's studio will show "Celebrating Glass," an exhibit of art glass from the 1800s to today that includes a rich olive green Demijohn Carboy that carried wine across the Atlantic in the 1800s, the work of renowned glass artist Ben Johnson, who studied in Italy and is the Glass Studio Chair at the Indianapolis Art Center. Nahrwold also will give visitors a peek at her latest Marbled Impressionism Pieces, which she's finishing up for Penrod.

Nancy Lee is showing Katrina Murray's "Particle Physics" with all sales benefiting the extremely talented artist, who's now recovering from a brain injury and is unable to paint or teach.

Emerging artists

Between the Dot and the Dash at The Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery, 212 W. 10th St., features the emerging artists Cheryl Lorance and Marna Shopoff, who are the 2014-15 Stutz Residents. Both artists have been featured in local and national galleries. Lorance paints and creates limestone sculpture, while Shopoff is a contemporary fine artist.

The opening reception is from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m., and the exhibit runs through Sept. 30.

Robert Price's Some Landscapes of North America debuts at the Art Bank this Friday. - COURTESY OF THE ART BANK
  • Courtesy of The Art Bank
  • Robert Price's Some Landscapes of North America debuts at the Art Bank this Friday.

North American landscapes

Photographer and geologist Rob Price will show Some Landscapes of North America in the Feature Room of the Art Bank, 911 Mass Ave.

"The more I photographed the landscapes, the more I appreciated the forms and colors wrought by time, water and wind, so much so that at times I feel I need to smack my head to make sure that what I'm seeing is real," Price says. "Naturally, after so many years collecting them I feel compelled to share them."

He aims to represent natural landscapes as realistically as possible, often waiting hours in a stream and other environments until he feels comfortable that he has the shot he wants. He often stitches several pictures together so viewers can see the full vista he saw amid the original setting.

His hope is that people who see his art will leave with a deeper appreciation of how the world formed over time.

"Every natural scene on this Earth that is presented to your eyes throughout your whole life is a convolution of the effects of light, water and the passage of time," Price explains. "Water and the passage of time are the creators and light is the illuminator of the shapes and forms of the life and rocks that we see. And while we can see water almost everywhere if we just wait a while, most of us do not think about the passage of time implicit in the creation and metamorphosis of the world in front of our eyes."

Privilege

Casey Roberts's Privileged Moments... (with everything in a row) opens Friday at the Harrison Center for the Arts. - COURTESY OF THE HARRISON CENTER FOR THE ARTS
  • Courtesy of the Harrison Center for the Arts
  • Casey Roberts's Privileged Moments... (with everything in a row) opens Friday at the Harrison Center for the Arts.

As always on a First Friday, the Harrison Center for the Arts is bursting at the seams with art -- or in this case, at the stiches. Shows include Jed Dorsey's The Sun Also Rises, about light skittering across urban Indianapolis, and then there's Casey Roberts's Privileged Moments that uses photo processing chemicals to make "large idiosyncratic landscape paintings, man and nature trying to work it out, little magic moments."

Indy Jazz Fest will provide music in the courtyard, and more than 35 artists will throw open their studio doors to visitors.

In the Gallery Annex, Kristy Childress will show Recollection, which is work in a wide variety of materials that merges images of her childhood homes with personal observations of relocation and new territories. In Gallery No. 2, Tasha Lewis is showing off her new fiber work in an exhibit entitled Stitched.

"In the past four years I explored how a collection of cyanotype photographs on cotton can be transformed into a skin for my mixed-media paper sculptures," Lewis says. "These pieces remained the cool natural blue of the cyanotype process. Recently I began integrating found textiles and embroidery into and around these photographic prints. This show is a survey of my discoveries. While the themes of the pieces vary, the stitch remains central. Thread is both a record of my action of making and a new avenue for added color and texture in my work. Inspired by traditional embroidery techniques, myth, art history and the power of magnets, this collection of sculptures and sewn paintings ties my love of nature with my love of making."

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