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Autumn's First Friday Fun

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The Pumpkin Spice Latte season is upon us, along with haunted houses, fright-night fests and fall breaks. What better way to kick off October than with gallery walks amid First Friday offerings?

This month they include historic German art posters, Indian art, photo diaries of Indianapolis Public Schools' students, a sculptural exploration of the soul and haunting, elegiac images of vacant buildings, or what's sometimes called ruin porn. A wide array of art awaits. Here's just a sampling:

Biocentrism

You've almost certainly seen Barbara Stahl's work before, even if you don't realize it.

Stahl, the owner of Stahl Studios Inc., paints the huge Indiana Pacers Schedule Wall downtown, as well as all the hand-painted sponsorship ads in Bankers Life Fieldhouse. She also created two of the murals for the Super Bowl, including Morning Magnolias on the canal.

An exhibit at the Satch Lost and Found Art Studio in the Circle City Industrial Complex features original prints from the historic German art poster journal Das Plakat. - COURTESY SATCH LOST AND FOUND ART STUDIO/GALLERY
  • Courtesy Satch Lost and Found Art Studio/Gallery
  • An exhibit at the Satch Lost and Found Art Studio in the Circle City Industrial Complex features original prints from the historic German art poster journal Das Plakat.

Stahl's Biocentric Landscapes opens with a reception between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. Friday at Gallery 924, located at (of course) 924 N. Pennsylvania St. Beer and wine will be served.

Art of the Poster

The Satch Lost and Found Art Studio in the Grand Hall on the second floor of the Circle City Industrial Complex, 1125 E. Brookside Ave., will show Das Plakat: Art of the Poster, 1910 - 1921, Berlin, betwee 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. on First Friday.

The exhibit at the CCIC shows original pages and prints from the journal Das Plakat, which emerged from Berlin’s world-leading aesthetic movement of the art poster in the early 20th century. The journal charts the history of early European industrialization, commerce and politics. It features the collection of a German who gathered 12,500 posters that were later confiscated by the Nazis before he was sent off to a concentration camp.

Your True Self

A sculptor hopes to encourage people to be more individual and find their true selves.

Sam Bowen, who works with wood, metal epoxy, wire and mixed media, is exhibiting Human Soul Inside in the Feature Room to the left when you first walk into the Art Bank, 911 Massachusetts Ave.

“We have the choice to come alive and ignite what is in our true self,” Bowen says. “This show is about encouraging this current generation through symbolical sculptures, having this reminder that they can do more instead of accepting their current state and changing it with persistence.”

Bowen, who hosts a monthly sculptor group at the Art Bank, often creates his symbolical sculptures at the Art Bank. He seeks to create positive messages, inspiring people to walk away with positivity and the belief they can accomplish their dreams.

Encouragement is the word I stand for,” Bowen says. “In this day in age we need more influences to empower this generation and the next. Everyone needs a positive influence in day-to-day life.”

He'll also have additional programing at the gallery throughout the course of the month.

Sam Bowen's The Human Soul Inside opens at the Art Bank this First Friday. - COURTESY THE ART BANK
  • Courtesy the Art Bank
  • Sam Bowen's The Human Soul Inside opens at the Art Bank this First Friday.

Blight in Fountain Square

The Attic had so much success in the Do317 Lounge last First Friday that it's back with another exhibit showing the work of Jeremy Price and Sine Qua Non Photography for this month's event. Ole Smoky Moonshine is again a sponsor, and there will be prints available from local Indianapolis artists Jake Lee, Troy Holleman, Corey Zeigert and Ronlewhorn Industries.

Catch Jeremy Price's work on display in the Do317 Lounge at the Murphy Arts Center. - COURTESY THE MURPHY ARTS CENTER
  • Courtesy the Murphy Arts Center
  • Catch Jeremy Price's work on display in the Do317 Lounge at the Murphy Arts Center.

The exhibit on the second floor of the Murphy Arts Center, 1043 Virginia Ave., features Price, who imagines a collision between the natural and supernatural worlds. Sine Qua Non Photography is essentially Indianapolis-based photographer Nate Handlang, who takes pictures of architecture, cityscapes, landscapes and wildlife. The urban explorer will show works from his Abandoned Indiana project that seeks to document derelict and decrepit buildings in the Indianapolis area.

The opening reception (for visitors 21 and older) takes place at 6 p.m. to 11 p.m.

A Story Changed

Indianapolis Public Schools students have a voice in the Changing the Story exhibit at The Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery, 212 W. 10th St. B110.

Changing the Story is a multi-faceted exhibit that shows the photo diaries of eight IPS students in the College Mentors for Kids program, as well as pieces by 10 visual artists who wanted to challenge misperceptions about children living in poverty. The artists -- including Jeremy Amico, Debbie Bredemus, Martha Carlson, Don Fitzpatrick, and Mary Hamilton -- have used paintings, photography and sculpture to tell stories about how role models can mentor impoverished youths.

“This has been an incredibly moving experience for me to work with such talented artists who committed so much of their time to share the challenges, emotions, sadness and successes of some of our city’s most vulnerable children," Gallery Director Leigh Dunnington-Jones says. "Our hope through this exhibit is to use our art forms to be storytellers for these children and for College Mentors for Kids -- an organization committed to providing hope through mentoring."

The exhibit debuts from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday, and runs until Oct. 30.

Jeremy Amico's Root Chakra represents one of the pieces in Changing the Story at the Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery. - COURTESY THE RAYMOND JAMES STUTZ ART GALLERY
  • Courtesy the Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery
  • Jeremy Amico's Root Chakra represents one of the pieces in Changing the Story at the Raymond James Stutz Art Gallery.

One Way of Seeing

Indian artists produced the Global Art Exchange exhibit Ways of Seeing, which opens from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. on Friday at the Harrison Center for the Arts, 1505 N. Delaware. The show, curated by Delhi resident Stefan Eicher, holds a mirror to society and focuses on themes such as religious communalism, economic disparity and violence against women.

Eicher, the Art for Change Foundation director, aims to promote cross-cultural awareness.

Other exhibits in the sprawling art complex on the Near North Side include Indianapolis Saved on Campus in The City Gallery and Lines and Curves in The Gallery Annex.

Nathan Foxton’s The Hunt also debuts at the Harrison Gallery.

His show includes oil paintings, acrylic paintings, collages, photography, digital collage and drawing.

"I couldn't 'land' in the same way and I had to confront what it was that fascinated me about painting itself," he says. I'm now figuring out how to collide themes of invention and discovery with an observed space. My practice grounds me in active engagement."

The Harrison Center for the Arts cultural exchange program, the Global Art Exchange, will exhibit Ways of Seeing this First Friday. - COURTESY OF THE HARRISON CENTER FOR THE ARTS
  • Courtesy of the Harrison Center for the Arts
  • The Harrison Center for the Arts cultural exchange program, the Global Art Exchange, will exhibit Ways of Seeing this First Friday.

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